Foot Health Diabetes

Diabetes can be dangerous to your feet—even a small cut can produce serious consequences. Diabetes may cause nerve damage that takes away the feeling in your feetDiabetes may also reduce blood flow to the feet, making it harder to heal an injury or resist infection.

Local Podiatrists

Dr. Jennifer Gerres

Dr. Jennifer Gerres

DPM
Podiatrist
Silver Spring, MD
Dr. Mikel Daniels

Dr. Mikel Daniels

DPM
Podiatrist
Owings Mills, MD
Stuart Berry

Stuart Berry

Podiatrist
Niagara Falls, ON

Diabetes and Footwear

Diabetes can affect the foot fairly significantly.

Typically, what you’ll see in a foot with diabetes, whether it’s type 1 or type 2 , is that there will be decreased circulation and decreased sensation. So the lack of circulation really affects healing time so proper footcare is really important by someone who’s trained in treating a diabetic foot.

In terms of sensation changes in the foot you will have decreased sensation typically with diabetes, and it gets worse the longer you have the disease. It’s really important with decreased sensation to work with someone who can fit shoes properly and who can fit insoles properly, if that’s needed, a specialist in those areas.

In terms of the shoe you want to make sure there’s no seams on the inside of the shoe to irritate the top of the foot, and in terms of the insole you want to make sure that it’s distributing the pressure across the bottom of the foot.

If there are any bony prominences there that are going to be prone to breakdown, that you have a little bit of an accommodation in the area of the prominence, just to even the pressure out through the bottom of the foot.

Presenter: Ms. Jody Weightman, Pedorthist, Vancouver, BC

Local Practitioners: Pedorthist

Eugene Mar, BSc (Pharm), Pharmacist, discusses foot products for diabetes.

Diabetes Foot Care Products

With circulation, and decrease of circulation specifically with diabetes, comes many problems, including nerve damage and peripheral vascular problems at the bottom of the feet and fingertips.

A lot of diabetics, if the damage gets severe enough, can’t actually feel the bottom of their feet, and if they happen to step on something that could hurt them, they might not actually feel it. And the damage could be done without them even knowing it.

What we usually try to tell people is if you are diabetic, you should be checking your feet every day on a regular basis as a routine, just to help maintain and prevent any sort of damage that could be done.

Some of the things that you can do, of course, if using a specially-designed diabetic sock. In this case, it’s designed with reinforced toes and no seams and extra padding to help prevent pressure sores that might develop in your shoe.

Hydration is also a very important part of diabetic foot care. We always make sure that we have enough care with the feet, otherwise we get cracking of the soles and the heels, most importantly, and they don’t heal quite as well if you’re diabetic.

If someone comes in with a diabetic sore, we always make sure that we refer to a specialist because their wounds heal quite a bit slower because of the circulation problems that can arise from diabetes.

If you do have more questions about your foot care, especially if you’re diabetic, you can, of course, see your pharmacist because there is a lot of knowledge and information available to you and products that can help you maintain and prevent further problems with your feet or any other related symptom associated with diabetes.

If you have further questions, you can always ask your diabetic educator, a foot care nurse or a podiatrist.

Presenter: Mr. Eugene Mar, Pharmacist, Vancouver, BC

Local Practitioners: Pharmacist

Local Pedorthists

Lindsay Fraser

Lindsay Fraser

Pedorthist
Grimsby, ON
Tania DeBenedetti

Tania DeBenedetti

Pedorthist
Hamilton, ON
Erin Kesler

Erin Kesler

Pedorthist
Oakville, ON
Mr. Mike Bryce

Mr. Mike Bryce

Pedorthist
Oakville, ON

Diabetes Now

Diabetes Now

QA Chat
Ask us a health question on
diagnosis/treatment options...