Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is a condition in which your immune system destroys insulin-making cells in your pancreas. These are called beta cells. The condition is usually diagnosed in children and young people, so it used to be called juvenile diabetes.

A condition called secondary diabetes is like , but your beta cells are wiped out by something else, like a disease or an injury to your pancreas, rather than by your immune system.

Dr. Bruce Perkins highlights what is said and what is sometimes not said when patients speak to their physicians about their type 1 diabetes.

Quiz: Do You Understand Type 2 Diabetes?

Test your knowledge by answering the following questions:

Questions
True
False
1

Checking your blood sugars daily at home with a glucometer can help prevent diabetes complications.

Explanation:
If you have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes you will want to ensure that you monitor your blood sugar levels carefully in order to avoid complications. Checking your blood sugars daily at home with a glucometer is one way you can do this.
2

The A1C target for most patients is 9.0% or lower.

Explanation:
The A1C target for most patients is 7.0% or lower. Keeping your A1C within a normal range can help reduce the complications of diabetes in the future. When these targets are not reached patients put themselves at risk for heart disease, stroke, eye damage, nerve damage and kidney damage.
3

Daily physical exercise can actually help improve your blood glucose levels.

Explanation:
There are a number of lifestyle considerations for diabetes patients when trying to lower and control blood sugar levels. In combination with a healthy mean plan, daily physical exercise can significantly contribute to overall health and improved blood glucose control.
4

Almost 60% of people who have type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese.

Explanation:
Almost 90% of people who have type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese. Being overweight or obese puts added pressure on the body's ability to properly use insulin to control blood sugar levels, increasing the risk of developing diabetes.
5

Stress will not affect your blood sugar levels.

Explanation:
Diabetes management can affect one’s emotional well being. It’s well known that being stressed can raise blood sugar levels, so it’s important for patients with diabetes to learn some techniques to help reduce stress.
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Vikaas’s Story Type 1 Diabetes : Type 1 Diabetes Think Tank Network

Lori Berard, RN, CDE, Registered Nurse, talks about what tests and targets are important for patients living with Diabetes.

What is the Prevalence of Diabetes?

Other than gestational diabetes, there are two main types of diabetes: type I diabetes and type II.

Patients with type I Diabetes have run out of insulin, and will generally, early on in the disease, require to be on insulin; pills don’t work for them. Type II patients, patients with type II Diabetes, initially can be treated with pills, but for many of them, after having the disease for many years, your body’s production of insulin tends to decrease, and you, too, will also require insulin.

Insulin is a hormone; it has a number of functions, but the primary one is lowering of blood sugar in the blood. Your body produces other hormones which elevate blood sugar. So what’s happening continuously is it’s like the gas and the brake on a car – it’s being adjusted continuously.

If you’re healthy and you don’t have diabetes and you eat food, your body automatically produces insulin to prevent the sugar that you’ve eaten from making your blood sugar shoot up too high. If you have diabetes, that’s not gonna occur; you have to anticipate the food intake and make sure you’ve got insulin in your body at the time to prevent very high sugars.

Insulin comes in a number of different formulations. It’s important to discuss your particular situation with your pharmacist or health care provider in terms of how it impacts your health and may have an impact on other medications that you’re taking.

Presenter: Dr. Richard Bebb, Endocrinologist, Victoria, BC

Local Practitioners: Endocrinologist

Dr. Amish Parikh : This is a patient story about their experience with hypoglycemia. Type 1 Diabetes Think Tank Network

Local Endocrinologist

Dr. Dina Prus

Dr. Dina Prus

Endocrinologist
Belleville, NJ
Dr. Roshney Jacob-Issac

Dr. Roshney Jacob-Issac

Endocrinologist
Belleville, NJ
Dr. Swaminathan Giridharan

Dr. Swaminathan Giridharan

Endocrinologist
Brooklyn, NY
Dr. Harry Shapiro

Dr. Harry Shapiro

Endocrinologist
Brooklyn, NY

Diabetes Now

Diabetes Now

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