Dr. David Maberley, MD, MSc. (Epid), FRCSC, Ophthalmologist, discusses diabetic retinopathy and how it is prevented and treated.
Sarah Ware, RD, Registered Dietician and Nick Pratap, BSc, Kin, Clinical Exercise Physiologist, talks about how healthy food and exercise, including bell peppers can help improve overall health.
Dr. Greg Moloney, MBBS, BSC MED, MMED, FRCSC, Ophthalmologist, talks about vision correction by RLE (Refractive Lens Exchange).
Dr. Greg Moloney, MBBS, BSC MED, MMED, FRCSC, Ophthalmologist, talks about vision correction by the SMART Surface laser procedure.

What is Local Ophthalmologist

A local ophthalmologist is an eye doctor who specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of eye disorders and systemic diseases that manifest in eye symptoms. They perform both medical and surgical procedures on the eyes. People with type 1 or type 2 diabetes are at risk of developing diabetes-related eye conditions such as diabetic retinopathy. This disease is caused by damage to the blood vessels in the tissues of the retina. If you aren’t managing blood sugar levels properly, you’re at a higher risk of developing diabetic retinopathy. A local ophthalmologist can work with your local endocrinologist to create the optimal diabetes treatment plan for you to treatr diabetic retinopathy.

People often visit a Local Ophthalmologist to treat diabtes and eye condions. An ophthalmologist is a physician who specializes in Eye Care and Vision Testing the medical and surgical care of the eyes and visual system. So our first step in treating diabetic retinopathy is making sure a patient’s blood sugar is optimized, that whatever treatments they’re receiving for their diabetes in the systemic level are optimally managed,

As glaucoma progresses, it damages more and more of your optic nerve fibers, leading to vision loss. In many cases, people don’t know that they have glaucoma until they experience vision loss. While glaucoma can be controlled, it can’t be cured. With primary open-angle glaucoma, the fluid can’t effectively flow back out of your eye. Angle-closure glaucoma occurs when the iris of the eye closes off the drainage angle completely, causing an increase in IOP pressure and damage to the optic nerve. Acute angle-closure glaucoma is considered an emergency, as this sudden buildup of fluid causes an increase in IOP and can damage the optic nerve or lead to vision loss in a very short period of time. Unlike other types of glaucoma, acute angle-closure glaucoma causes symptoms such as nausea, vomiting and eye pain.

If you have a condition known as ocular hypertension, which is a result of high ocular pressure, your risk of developing glaucoma increases.Your optometrist or ophthalmologist may want to lower your IOP as a preventative measure. However, you don’t need to have high IOP to experience glaucoma. Normal-tension glaucoma causes damage to the optic nerve, even though the person’s IOP is normal. In this case, your eye health professional may recommend lowering your IOP to slow the progression of the disease.

Glaucoma is an eye disease caused by a buildup of intraocular pressure (IOP). Your eyes have clear liquid that flows in and out, but if you have glaucoma, this liquid doesn’t drain properly, causing this buildup of IOP pressure. As glaucoma progresses, it damages more and more of your optic nerve fibers, leading to vision loss. Angle-closure glaucoma occurs when the iris of the eye closes off the drainage angle completely, causing an increase in IOP pressure and damage to the optic nerve.

For some patients seeking to get out of glasses, laser may not be a good option. This might be because your correction is too high, or your cornea too thin. For patients in this category the ICL may offer an alternative. 

An ICL is a thin, highly flexible lens that can be implanted into the anterior chamber of the eye, underneath the iris. This is not visible to you after the surgery. The lens is able to correct high amounts of myopia (short sightedness), hyperopia (long sightedness) and astigmatism.

ICL surgery is an intraocular procedure and carries risk. Dr. Moloney needs to be sure you have adequate space to accommodate the lens and a healthy cornea. Just like laser surgery, not everyone will be a candidate for an ICL.

 If you are interested in refractive surgery but have been told you are not a candidate, ICL surgery may be suitable option for you.

            

 

Dr. David Ehmann

Dr. David Ehmann

Ophthalmologist
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Dr. Eli Moses

Dr. Eli Moses

Cataract, Cornea, & Refractive Surgeon
Ophthalmologist
Fairfield, NJ
Dr. Shyam Patel

Dr. Shyam Patel

MD Cataract, Cornea, & Refractive Surgeon
Ophthalmologist
Fairfield, NJ
Dr. Adam Chubak

Dr. Adam Chubak

Cornea, Refractive, and Cataract
Ophthalmologist
Fairfield, NJ
Dr. Theodore Perl

Dr. Theodore Perl

MD Cornea & Refractive Surgeon
Ophthalmologist
Fairfield, NJ
Dr. Yuna Rapoport

Dr. Yuna Rapoport

MD, MPH Corneal, Cataract & Refractive Surgeon
Ophthalmologist
Fairfield, NJ
Dr. Lawrence Yannuzzi

Dr. Lawrence Yannuzzi

Ophthalmologist
New York, NY
Dr. J.P. Dailey

Dr. J.P. Dailey

Ophthalmologist
Erie, PA
Dr. Dr. Douglas Babel

Dr. Dr. Douglas Babel

MD
Ophthalmologist
Erie, PA
Dr. Robert Baldwin

Dr. Robert Baldwin

Ophthalmologist
Erie, PA
Dr. David Almeida

Dr. David Almeida

MD, PhD
Ophthalmologist
Erie, PA
Dr. Adnan Pirbhai

Dr. Adnan Pirbhai

Ophthalmologist
Fort Erie, ON
Dr. Patricia Teal

Dr. Patricia Teal

Ophthalmologist
Fort Erie, ON
Dr. Mario Ventresca

Dr. Mario Ventresca

Ophthalmologist
Port Colborne, ON
Dr. Jamie Vahdat

Dr. Jamie Vahdat

Ophthalmologist
Welland, ON
Dr. Andrew Taylor

Dr. Andrew Taylor

Ophthalmologist
Niagara Falls, ON
Dr. Richard E. Selser

Dr. Richard E. Selser

Ophthalmologist
Mansfield, OH
Dr. Amber Sheikh

Dr. Amber Sheikh

Ophthalmologist
Niagara Falls, ON
Dr. Anthony Cabrera

Dr. Anthony Cabrera

Ophthalmologist
St Catharines, ON
Dr. El-Karim Rhemtulla

Dr. El-Karim Rhemtulla

Ophthalmologist
St Catharines, ON
1 - 20 of 874 results

Diabetes Now

Diabetes Now

-->